wetheurban:

ART: Intense Paintings by Xue Jiye

High level of intensity from Chinese artist Xue Jiye. No additives or preservatives.

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Reblogged from WETHEURBAN
Reblogged from Loca Como Tu

exgynocraticgrrl:

Gerda Lerner (1920-2013) , former Robinson Edwards Professor Emerita of History at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

Gerda Lerner (1920-2013)  Women and History (excerpt)
-- A Thinking Allowed DVD w/ Jeffrey Mishlove

rhamphotheca:

Sex? It all started 385 million years ago
It may not have been love as we know it, but around 385 million years ago, our very distant ancestors—armoured fish called placoderms—developed the art of intercourse.
So suggest a team of evolutionary scientists, who point to the fossil of a placoderm species blessed with the name of Microbrachius dicki.
Measuring about eight centimetres (four inches) in length, M. dicki lived in habitats in modern-day Scotland—where the first specimen was found in 1888—and in Estonia and China.
Placoderms have previously been found to be the most primitive jawed animal—the earliest known vertebrate forerunner of humans.But they now have an even more honoured…
(read more: PhysOrg)
illustration: Dr. Brian Choo/Flinders Univ.

rhamphotheca:

Sex? It all started 385 million years ago

It may not have been love as we know it, but around 385 million years ago, our very distant ancestors—armoured fish called placoderms—developed the art of intercourse.

So suggest a team of evolutionary scientists, who point to the fossil of a placoderm species blessed with the name of Microbrachius dicki.

Measuring about eight centimetres (four inches) in length, M. dicki lived in habitats in modern-day Scotland—where the first specimen was found in 1888—and in Estonia and China.

Placoderms have previously been found to be the most primitive jawed animal—the earliest known vertebrate forerunner of humans.But they now have an even more honoured…

(read more: PhysOrg)

illustration: Dr. Brian Choo/Flinders Univ.

Reblogged from fauna
rhamphotheca:

What Causes Brazil’s ‘Meeting of the Waters’?
by Bec Crew
This is what it looks like when the Solimões River meets the Rio Negro in Brazil.
Almost 10 kilometres from the inland city of Manaus in northern Brazil, ‘the Meeting of the Waters’ is the point where two of Amazon River’s largest tributaries - a smaller river that flows into a bigger ‘parent’ river - converge but never mix.
The Solimões River forms the lighter half, its ‘cafe au lait’ colouring owed to the rich sediment that runs down from the Andes Mountains, including sand, mud and silt. Known as a ‘white water river’, the Solimões River stretches over a 1600 km distance. 
The darker side is the Rio Negro, and it gets its ‘black tea’ hue from leaf and plant matter that has decayed and dissolved in the water. It might look dark and murky, but the Rio Negro carries little or no sediment, and according to the European Space Agency website, is considered one of the cleanest natural waters in the world. On really clear days, water visibility in this black water river can exceed nine metres. ..
(read more: Science Alert - Australia)
Image: Danocoo1/Reddit.com

rhamphotheca:

What Causes Brazil’s ‘Meeting of the Waters’?

by Bec Crew

This is what it looks like when the Solimões River meets the Rio Negro in Brazil.

Almost 10 kilometres from the inland city of Manaus in northern Brazil, ‘the Meeting of the Waters’ is the point where two of Amazon River’s largest tributaries - a smaller river that flows into a bigger ‘parent’ river - converge but never mix.

The Solimões River forms the lighter half, its ‘cafe au lait’ colouring owed to the rich sediment that runs down from the Andes Mountains, including sand, mud and silt. Known as a ‘white water river’, the Solimões River stretches over a 1600 km distance. 

The darker side is the Rio Negro, and it gets its ‘black tea’ hue from leaf and plant matter that has decayed and dissolved in the water. It might look dark and murky, but the Rio Negro carries little or no sediment, and according to the European Space Agency website, is considered one of the cleanest natural waters in the world. On really clear days, water visibility in this black water river can exceed nine metres. ..

(read more: Science Alert - Australia)

Image: Danocoo1/Reddit.com

Reblogged from fauna

darksilenceinsuburbia:

Christian Stoll

Psychology of Colors

  What color is “the love”? What exactly does the color black stand for? Is black a color? What color combination is reflecting “vanity” ?   I recently came across Eva Heller´s book ” Wie Farben wirken”,which examines the psychological effects and symbolisms of colors. Each color creates it´s own mental connection,and the combination of certain  colors in a specific percentage can reflect a feeling or a symbol. This series is illustrating 10 color combinations out of 200 you can find in the book.  (artist statement)

rhamphotheca:

(via: CrankyDinosaur)
Reblogged from fauna
A human being is a part of a whole, called by us “universe”, a part limited in time and space He experiences himself, his thoughts and feelings as something separated from the rest…a kind of optical delusion of his consciousness. This delusion is a kind of prison for us, restricting us to our personal desires and to affection for a few persons nearest to us. Our talk must be to free ourselves from this prison by widening our circle of compassion to embrace all living creatures and the whole of nature in its beauty.
Albert Einstein (via missfolly)
Reblogged from Miss Folly